http://www.radiotimes.com/content/features/galleries/doctorwhocovers/01/

 

http://www.radiotimesarchive.co.uk/

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/historyofthebbc/resources/tvhistory/audio_video.shtml

 

http://www.teletronic.co.uk/tvera.htm (1st day schedule 1936)

 

http://www.archive.org/search.php?query=creator%3A%22BBC%22%20AND%20subject%3A%22Watch%20with%20Mother%22

watch with mother:Andy pandy ep

 

Although the title Watch with Mother did not come into existence until 1952, Andy Pandy, the mainstay of the series, was first broadcast in July 1950. Two years later it was joined by The Flowerpot Men and later in the 1950s these shows were scheduled alongside Rag, Tag and Bobtail in 1953, and Picture Book and The Woodentops in 1955. Initially Andy Pandy was shown in the afternoon between 3:45 P.M. and 4:00 P.M. at the end of the women's programme For Women. But in the 1960s Watch with Mother was scheduled at lunch time. The different programmes within the series were shown on specific days of the week: Picture Book on Monday, Andy Pandy on Tuesday, The Flowerpot Men on Wednesday, Rag, Tag and Bobtail on Thursday and The Woodentops on Friday. The series was eventually taken off-air and replaced by See-Saw in 1980.

 

 

Scheduling:

 

 

What goes where across the broadcasting day

 

And the degree to which this mirrors the structure and habits of the audiences day in relation to the varied character of the audience e.g. 1950s/60s housewives with children – thus children’s progs Watch with Mother from around 12.45-1pm. Equally the recognition of  desire for progs in the afternoon for women and the unemployed led to the extension of afternoon TV in 1972.

 

In other words, there is an interaction between scheduler and audience in relation to the understanding of the society in which wE live and its habits and routines.

 

TALK ABOUT PHENOMENOLOGY OF THE SCHEDULE FOR THE AUDIENCE – THE IDEA OF THEIR DAY AND ANTICPATION STRUCTURE ETC

 

 

History of radio Times as scheduling of the audience

 

Put on good progs v proper scheduling:

Initially not so much taken into account – early days for radio and tv tended to put progs on  which were seen as suitable for the audience in line with a Reithian agenda and the need to cover a fairly wide range of tastes across the nation. Though of course childrens progs and religious progs would have an obviously selected pace in the schedule. (Look at early RT)

 

The importance of the National Event: Coronation/National Sporting events; schedule cleared for those.

 

 

The split day: mid day progs and then evening

 

But essentially right into the early 60s the relatively few number of hours devoted to TV - even in the 60s close down was 10.30 and with a close down in the afternoon, what you had was very little day-time TV except for children’s Tv and regional progs: Heddiw) and then the early/evening fare from again childrn’s progs such as Blue Peter from 4.00pm until 5.45 ad thn adult progs with the early eve news onwards.

 

Weekend T: on sats obviously we had grandstands and sports/sun religious progs in the AM/films in afternoon and then children’s classic serial – Talk about the idea of how people liver and what weekends were like in Britain

 

THE GROWTH OF SET PIECE TV – THE SATURDAY EVENING THAT GOES MID-WEEK IN 70S LIGHT ENTS AND THE MID-EVE SOAPS WITH CROSS ROADS ON DURING EARLY AFTERNOON AND MINOR DRAMA’S AT LUNCH-TIME ‘CROWN COURT’ – AGAIN FOR housewives etc.

Radio re-scheduling causes more revolt by audience than tv re-scheduling.

 

Summer season stuff and complaints

 

INNOVATION ON BBC2 – 7 FACES OF BBC2 – 1964. AND THUS THE CULTURAL SPLIT BETWEEN BBC1 AND BBC2 FARE

 

THE IMPORTANCE OF COMPETITION 1955 TV Times

 

THE MPORTANCE OF ADVERTISING FOR ITV. + scheduling ITV POPULISM.

 

1990s Newspapers can do schedule listings and then take other providers listings.

Death of TV Times

 

Importance of Newspapers discussion of progs apart from the TV critics

 

The 24 hour cycle/time shifting/rise of IPTV and the current scene where loss of audiences, migration and loss of youth and down-turn of advertising revenue has led to sharp declines of certain kinds of progs – children progs that then lads to changes in the schedules at various sections of the day.