IRD 2066: Placement Module (2018-19)

 

Monday 12 - 2pm          Senate Building, SN 107.

(There may be sessions which have to be held on another day than Mondays as speakers and experts on employability cannot always fit in easily with or timetabling)

 

The purpose of this module is to provide students with knowledge and skills for conducting theoretical and empirical inquiries when they undertake their placements or internships. The module will provide sessions on preparing for employability and for the placement (c.100 hours (ideally) in the March to May period 2019)

 

Students taking this module develop their understanding in a real world setting and are also equipped with a range of skills and techniques to help them devise, manage and communicate their research effectively.

 

·        Finding a placement/internship

·        Changemaker Hub and resources

·        Career and employment opportunities

·        Skills mapping/development

·        Networking

·        Applications and CVs

·        Research and ethical issues in a placement context

·        Critical reflection

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1. Many students find success securing a placement by contacting their local MPs of interest.  Use the following website to identify local MP's in the area where you want to do your placement:

https://www.parliament.uk/mps-lords-and-offices/mps/ 

2.  You might want to consider researching the following when identify possible placement opportunities:

- UK Parliament

- Local UK Political Party Offices

- Confederation of British Industry (CBI)

- W4MP (Working for an MP) 

- NGO's & Government departments:

- Political Think Tanks

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

The module is assessed by a combination of two pieces of coursework, comprising a 1000 word Preparation & Log Book for Internship/Placement and a 3000 Word Placement Journal and Report.

 

Assessment Activity

Learning Outcomes

Weighting (%)

Code

Assessment Type

Assessment Deliverables

 

 

AS1

Logbook

1000-word logbook on preparation for placement

a, b, c

25

AS2

Journal and Report

3000-word journal and report on placement

d, e, f

75

 

 AS1- Employability and the 1,000 word Preparation for Internship/Placement + Logbook     

This consists of seven weeks of  Employability workshops and one-to-one appointments with Lisa Slaughter from Employability. The purpose of these workshops is to get you ready for your placement..The purpose of this first part is to assist you in researching and securing a political placement and in completing assignment two.

Please note there will be activities to complete prior to each employability session. We have called these activities ‘blended learning’ and they can be found on the IRD2066 Nile site in the ‘Module Activities’ folder.  It is important to complete the work beforehand and to write up the weekly assignment entries each week as it will form the content of each session and mean that you get the most out of the employability sessions and complete the assignment properly. 

 

AS2- 3000 word Journal and Report

This consists of advisory support tutorials when and where needed with staff. The purpose of this last part is to assist you in the final stages of preparing for your placement – specifically the placement report, where you have to do some research and report on policy. 

 

 

AS 1: 1000 Words

 In this part of the portfolio you are required to:

1.      Engage with the work you have covered in the eight weekly skills workshops in the first part of term one. Follow the structure set out below, using each workshop title as a sub-heading – please remember to attach all evidence & documentation.

2.      Provide a weekly update/commentary for eight weeks under each of eight skills workshops on your progress is searching and securing a political placement. These eight weeks can be a critical reflection of any six weeks leading up to you securing yourself a placement – please remember to attach all evidence & documentation.

Please include:

-        A title Page (with picture(s))

-        A contents Page

-        The 7 sections (below) critically reflecting upon the first 7 weeks: 

1) Each of the Employability sessions

2) Your weekly journey in searching and securing a political placement/internship 

     -    A reference section

     -    Appendixes (evidence of placement agreement form, CVs, letters, emails, pictures, photographs, paraphernalia, research docs.) – Note: does not contribute to the word limit!

It is a personal document so develop your own style but it should include the following:

In this part of the portfolio you are required to engage with the work you have covered in the skills workshops in terms one and two. Follow the structure set out below, using each workshop as a sub-heading. .  

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1. Structured Sessions about Preparing for the Placement (6 - 7 weeks)

 

I     Introroduction to the module: Changemaker Hub & Employability Plus

 

In this first introductory session we will go over the outline of the module – the teaching and learning programme, important resources and the assessment you are required to meet. As part of the session you will also understand: 

  • the services on offer from the Changemaker Hub and how they can help you both now and in the future
  • where you currently are with finding a placement and the employers/ organisations you can start to research in order to find a placement  

Assessment Criteria:   

  • Discuss how you will engage with the Changemaker Hub & Employability Plus and what you hope to gain from completing the employability sessions.  What are you going to participate in in addition to the in-curriculum sessions? How will your engagement with the service help you to secure your ideal placement/ future career?
  • Complete the Employability Plus registration (skills self-assessment and action plan) and attach your self-assessment to the appendices of your report.
  • Identify your next steps with finding  a placement

 

2.   2. Networking

 This week you will be attending a networking session.  The session covers what networking is, how you can do it successfully and gives you the chance to develop a professional pitch when approaching employers face-to-face and through an online Linked In profile. Through attending both you will:

  • Produce an elevator pitch for online and face-to-face use through the development of a Linked In profile to enhance your networking opportunities thereby increasing your chance of finding  a placement/ future employment opportunities

 Assessment Criteria:  

  • Briefly summarise the main points covered in this workshop on the benefits of undertaking networking to secure work experience
  • What have you learnt about networking and how will you use it to find a political placement?
  • Connect with the Changemaker Hub on Linked In
  • Attach your Linked In profile link to the appendices of your report

 

3.  3. How to find your ideal placement

 

This week you will attend the ideal placement session. In the session you will take part in a range of activities designed to make you think about who you are, what motivates you and what skills, knowledge, qualities and experience you have to offer. Understanding yourself as a person will help you to identify employers and therefore placements of interest. Through attending both you will:

  • Understand more about who you are and the careers you could be suited to 
  • Understand where to start looking for opportunities
  • Plan your next steps for securing a placement

Assessment Criteria: 

  • Complete and attach the Prospects psychometric career planning tool in the appendices of your report.  Comment on what you learnt from completing the tool?  Were there any surprises? How do you think your choice of placement will strengthen your employment prospects when you graduate?
  • Comment on the self-awareness activities carried out in the session – what have you learnt about yourself?
  • Attach 5 possible placements to your appendices briefly summarising what they are, what role you could take and how it will help your future career plans?
  • Comment on your next steps for securing a placement 

  

4. Skills awareness, applications and CVs

In this session you will take part in a number of activities designed to help you understand what makes a successful application.  

Through attending this session you will:

  • Think about the academic and transferable skills you are developing as a politics student and how you can write about them in an application
  • Discover the different types of CV used in the UK
  • understand what makes a good and bad application
  • learn how to sell yourself on paper

  Assessment Criteria: 

  • Using the skills self-assessment you completed in the first week, briefly summarise the transferable and academic skills you currently have 
  • What skills, strengths and areas for development have you identified and how do you plan to work on these skills?
  • What have you learnt about good and bad applications? 
  • What did you learn about how to tailor a CV and cover letter?
  • What are your actions moving forward to help you secure a placement? Complete an action plan to reflect this and attach it to the appendices of your report

 

 5. Preparing for interviews

This session aims to prepare you for attending an interview. What can you do to prepare?  How can you survive those difficult questions? This session will give you tips on how to cope in the interview situation and will allow you the opportunity to practice. Through attending this session you will:

  • understand how you can prepare for interviews
  • learn how to answer difficult questions and sell yourself to an employer
  • be able to minimize nerves and maximize on performance

Assessment Criteria: 

  • Comment on your previous experience of interviews; what went well?  Were there questions you struggled to answer? How confident do you feel about attending interviews?
  • What did you learn in this session and how could you implement that advice in the future?
  • How are you going to prepare for the mock assessment centre next week?
  • Complete the online interview simulator on the Changemaker Hub portal and comment on how you found the tool?  Was it useful? Were there any questions you found difficult?

 

6. Mock Assessment Centre

This session is a chance for you to put everything you have learnt in previous weeks into practice through a ‘mock’ assessment centre with employers. Attending this session you will:

  • take part in a panel interview with employers
  • understand the types of psychometric tests you might come across in the recruitment process
  • experience group activities likely to come up in graduate assessment centre

  Assessment Criteria:

  • How well prepared were you for the interview? Did you use the STAR technique? Were the examples you used varied? What do you need to do in order to improve in future interviews?  How did you feel during and after the interview?
  • How do you feel the group activity went?  Where do you think your strengths were within the group?  What would you try to do differently next time?  Were you an effective team member?  Did you feel your opinion was valued/ heard/ had impact?
  • What did you learn from the psychometric tests?  Do you need to improve?  If so, what do you plan to do? 
  • What are your actions moving forward to help you secure a placement? Update your action plan to reflect this and attach it to the appendices of your report 
  •  

Critically Reflective Conclusion  - To be Completed after week 8

  • Reflect on your learning experience in the workshops provided for this module.
  • You are required here to comment on your attendance. If you missed a workshop, how did you go about ensuring that some level of learning took place despite non-attendance?

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

AS 1: 1000 Words

 In this part of the portfolio you are required to:

1.      Engage with the work you have covered in the eight weekly skills workshops in the first part of term one. Follow the structure set out below, using each workshop title as a sub-heading – please remember to attach all evidence & documentation.

2.      Provide a weekly update/commentary for eight weeks under each of eight skills workshops on your progress is searching and securing a political placement. These eight weeks can be a critical reflection of any six weeks leading up to you securing yourself a placement – please remember to attach all evidence & documentation.

Please include:

-        A title Page (with picture(s))

-        A contents Page

-        The 7 sections (below) critically reflecting upon the first 7 weeks: 

1) Each of the Employability sessions

2) Your weekly journey in searching and securing a political placement/internship 

     -    A reference section

     -    Appendixes (evidence of placement agreement form, CVs, letters, emails, pictures, photographs, paraphernalia, research docs.) – Note: does not contribute to the word limit!

It is a personal document so develop your own style but it should include the following:

In this part of the portfolio you are required to engage with the work you have covered in the skills workshops in terms one and two. Follow the structure set out below, using each workshop as a sub-heading. 

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 

AS2 - 3,000 word Journal and Report

The journal should have the opportunity to ensure your internship/placement contributes to your final grade for the module and your overall degree. Please read the advice contained and apply to your specific circumstance and if you need further guidance please contact me. The grading will be based on both submissions as well as your engagement in the module.

Please include:

-              A title Page (with picture(s))

-              A contents Page

-              The 3 main sections (below)

a)     A weekly/daily diary

b)     Research Report

c)      Policy/Issue Report

-              A reference section

-              Appendixes - this must include an ethics form, examples of methods and data and anything else important. 

Important: Your placement report should use the key concepts and themes covered in the module wherever relevant and use any relevant knowledge gained on British Politics from your course.

Section A: 

A weekly/daily diary, that provides an accurate description and personal reflection of your placement experience. Comment upon:

·         What you learnt

·         The personal skills used and initiative shown

·         The working of an MPs office or the work placement

·         Tasks undertaken

·         Things that surprised you and interested you, made you laugh or cry

·         What you learnt about yourself

·         What you learnt about the organisation

·         How you handled problems and issues

(No word count)

Section B

In this section you should report on a piece of research carried out in the field on something of interest.

i.          Clearly state the research question and the title of the project.

ii.          Set out the aim/s and rationale for the project.

iii.          Write a mini-literature review (2-4+ pieces of highly relevant literature).

iv.          Set out the theoretical perspective you have chosen in which to locate your study.

v.          Set out the methodological approach and method/s used.

vi.          Discuss the research findings and relate them back to the literature.

vii.          Briefly conclude the placement report.

(1000 words)    

Section C

A report of an issue/policy area/specific task or activity or event you were significantly involved in or organised. This could take whatever format you want.

i.          Contextualise the nature and importance of the issue/policy area/specific task or activity or event you were significantly involved in or organised in the host institution whilst on placement.

ii.          Provide a discussion on two+ key concepts/ideas of political significance you have identified within your placement institution/context. You must draw on the literature here to achieve depth in the discussion.

iii.          Identify and discuss two competing theoretical frameworks that could be used to analyse and explain the issue/policy area/specific task or activity or event you were significantly involved in or organised in the host institution whilst on placement. 

iv.          Briefly conclude the placement report.

 (1000 words)

Conclusion

You should finish with a conclusion in which you reflect on your overall experience.

·         What skills/abilities did you learn/develop?

·         What have you learnt about politics and the democratic process – the academic discipline and the activity itself

·         How has the internship/placement affected you:

o        As a person?

o        As a student of politics?

o        As a researcher?

·         What do you think of your own performance overall?

·         How has it influenced your view of the future?

·         How has it contributed to your decisions on the dissertation?

 

Assessment Presentation

Please include a title page, contents page and a bibliography. You may include an acknowledgements page and appendices if you think this is appropriate. The report can also include photographs, diagrams, pictures, tables and relevant illustrative paperwork. All material additional to your written text is outside the word limit.

 

 

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Alternative AS2 - 3000 Words

Please note: All written assessments must be submitted in electronic format through Turnitin up to midnight. Late work is not accepted and will be penalised. Please click on the ‘Submit Your Work’ button on the IRD2066: Placement NILE site and follow the instructions to submit your work.

In the event of special circumstances an alternative assessment is available at the discretion of the module coordinator.         

PERSONAL EVALUATION AND RESEARCH REPORT ON POLITICS IN THE UK (or another context agreed by the module coordinator). 

IT IS STRONGLY ADVISED THAT YOUR CHOICE OF ISSUE AND RESEARCH QUESTION IS DISCUSSED AND AGREED WITH THE MODULE LEADER AND YOUR MODULE TUTOR.

NOTE: The Alternative Assignment replaces the journal/report produced on the placement/internship and will test a similar range of skills as the Journal/Report although it is impossible to replicate the experience of a placement or gain the valuable experience from it.

Follow the guidelines and structure outlined below and complete the assignment by the stipulated hand in date.

IT IS VITAL THAT YOU STILL ALSO HAND IN Assignment Two: Preparation & Log Book for Internship/Placement Weighted at 25% , SHOWING YOUR WORK IN TRYING TO GAIN A PLACEMENT AND THE PROCESS YOU EXPERIENCED. IT SHOULD COMMENT ON THE REASONS WHY A PLACEMENT WASN’T GAINED.

Guidelines

You should use the key concepts and themes covered in the module AND YOUR COURSE MORE GENERALLY wherever relevant to investigate an issue of significance to UK Democracy currently, particularly in relation to Parliamentary Sovereignty and Representative Democracy. It is likely to be more successful if you choose an issue of contemporary significance which you can research first hand/in the field.

EXAMPLES MIGHT INCLUDE: The changing role of the constituency MP, Reform of the Electoral System, the impact of Devolution on Parliamentary Democracy, Scottish Independence,  the use of mechanisms of Direct Democracy such as Referendums and Initiatives, the issue of the EU referendum, Reform of Parliament, the significance of local government and local democracy, the effect of Coalition Government on the Westminster Model of Governance, Pressure Groups and Democracy a contemporary issue such as the high speed rail link . The report should set out to answer a research question posed at the beginning. Local government is of little significance as it is controlled by central government and local people don’t care about it? The EU referendum is unlikely to solve the problem of our membership of the European Union?

Section A – DIARY OF WORK AND PERSONAL REFLECTION

A weekly diary, that provides an accurate description and personal reflection of your alternate assignment experience. Comment upon:

·         The reasons for your choice of topic/issue/question asked

·         The research and preparation process of deciding your issue

·         What you did to complete the secondary and primary research

·         What you learned

·         The personal skills used and initiative shown

·         How you handled problems and issues

·         What you learnt about yourself

·         What you learnt about the research conducted

(500 words)

Section B – Literature Review

A mini literature review that provides a critical overview/summary of the key literature that concerns your chosen issue of contemporary significance to UK Democracy.

It is expected that the research will be primarily library and internet based using the usual guidance for academic work. The Harvard method of referencing should be carefully followed.           

When conducting a literature review it is important to distinguish between the researching and the write-up. The researching is done on an author-by-author (or paper-by-paper) basis. The write-up is done on a history and theme or contextual issue-by-issue basis in which the views of different writers are compared and contrasted. In other words, your write-up would emphasise the ideas, not the authors (though, clearly, authors’ names are mentioned in the discussion – as it must be referenced!). However, there is no fixed format and you may need to modify your style according to the type of material you are presenting

(1000 words)

Section C – PRIMARY RESEARCH REPORT

A report on a small piece of primary research into the issue – e.g. a content analysis of media coverage of the election referendum, intervews with local pressure group leaders, a questionnaire conducted with the local electorate on local democracy.

i.          Clearly state the research question and the title of the project.

ii.          Contextualise the issue - summarising the (key) literature review above

iii.          Set out the aim/s and rationale for the project.

iv.          Set out the key concept(s) and theoretical perspective(s) you have chosen in which to locate your study.

v.          Set out the methodological approach and method(s) used.

vi.          Discuss the research findings and relate them back to the literature.

vii.          Briefly conclude the placement report.

(1250 words)

Conclusion

You should finish with a conclusion in which you summarise, evaluate and critically reflect upon the whole report, your chosen issue and your personal experience. Commenting on:

·         What have you learnt about politics and the democratic process – the academic discipline and the activity itself

·         What skills/abilities you learnt/developed?

·         How has it affected you:

o        As a person?

o        As a student of politics?

o        As a researcher?

·         What do you think of your own performance overall?

·         How has it influenced your view of the future?

·         How has it influenced you decision on the dissertation?

(500 words)

Assessment Presentation

Please include a title page, contents page and a bibliography. You may include an acknowledgements page and appendices if you think this is appropriate. The report can also include photographs, diagrams, pictures, tables and relevant illustrative paperwork. All material additional to your written text is outside the word limit. Please submit via turnitin but hand in additional material such as letters, documents, photographs, research instruments directly in a folder to the module staff.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

 

 

UNIVERSITY MODULAR FRAMEWORK - MODULE SPECIFICATION

 

This document forms the definitive overview as to the nature and scope of this module and is used in the University’s quality assurance processes.

 

The information in this document cannot be changed without approval (except for the Indicative Content).

 

 

FACULTY

Business & Law

SUBJECT AREA

International Relations & Politics

SUBJECT FIELD

Economics, International Relations & Development

MODULE TITLE

Politics and International Relations in Practice (Placement Module)

 

MODULE CODE

LEVEL

CREDIT VALUE

MODULE LEADER

IRD2066

5

20

Glyn Daly

 

PRE-REQUISITES:

None

CO-REQUISITES:

None

RESTRICTIONS:

None

SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS:

This module has supplementary regulations:                    No

MODULE OVERVIEW:

 

 

The purpose of this module is to provide students with key knowledge and skills for conducting theoretical and empirical inquiries when they undertake their placements or internships. Students taking this module develop their understanding in a real world setting and are also equipped with a range of skills and techniques to help them devise, manage and communicate their research effectively.

 

 

 

INDICATIVE CONTENT:

 

·        Finding a placement/internship

·        Changemaker Hub and resources

·        Career and employment opportunities

·        Skills mapping/development

·        Networking

·        Applications and CVs

·        Research and ethical issues in a placement context

·        Critical reflection

 

 

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

 

 

Module Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the module, with guidance students will be able to:

 

Subject-Specific Knowledge, Understanding & Application

a)     identify a range of graduate employment opportunities in the field of international relations and politics

b)      recognize and critically assess central political and practical issues in the world of work and organization

c) use knowledge and understanding of appropriate employment related activities such as CV writing, applications, skills mapping, networking.

d) make informed judgements about the placement/internship possibilities and assess their strengths and weaknesses in relation to ethical, methodological and conceptual themes and issues

Employability & Changemaker Skills

e)      communicate complex concepts, demonstrating professionalism, empathy and the ability to adapt to different audiences

f)        consider and apply different strategic approaches necessary for working in changing collaborative contexts

 

 

TYPICAL LEARNING, TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT HOURS (for the module as delivered on-site at the University of Northampton):

Learning and teaching information for this module when delivered off-site by UN partners is available from the partner institution’s NILE site (or equivalent). Any variation in study hours must be approved by the University of Northampton before students are enrolled, ensuring that study hours provision is always appropriate to support student achievement of the module learning outcomes.

 

Learning, Teaching and Assessment activities

Study hours

Contact hours: (total)

Comprising face-to-face and online contact hours as follows:

30

 

-         Face-to-face (total) Face to face interactive small group session

-          (generic space in groups of approx. 30 e.g. seminars/workshops/tutorials)

-          

-         Other - tutorials with careers staff

 

14

 

12

 

·        Online contact hours (total)
(comprising online activities with mediated tutor input)

4

Guided independent study hours
(including hours for assessment preparation)

70

Placement or Internship

100

Module Total

200

 

ALIGNMENT OF LEARNING OUTCOMES AND ASSESSMENTS:

 

 

Assessment Activity

Learning Outcomes

Weighting (%)

Code

Assessment Type

Assessment Deliverables

 

 

AS1

Logbook

1000-word logbook on preparation for placement

a, b, c

25

AS2

Journal and Report

3000-word journal and report on placement

d, e, f

75

 

The assessment items listed above are graded and contribute to the overall module grade (assessment of learning).

  Item

CAF Assessment Grades

These are the criteria required to achieve each classification at: Level 5

An outstanding Distinction

A+

Work which fulfils all the criteria of the grade below, but at an exceptional standard

A very strong Distinction

A

Work of distinguished quality which is based on a rigorous and detailed knowledge base, including major theories of the discipline(s) and awareness of the variety of ideas, contexts and frameworks and wider implications.  Work will demonstrate sustained ability to analyse, synthesise, evaluate and interpret concepts, principles and data within field of study in a considered manner, as well as to develop convincing arguments and judgements appropriate to the field of study/ assessment task.  There will be strong evidence of competence across a range of specialised skills using them to plan, develop and evaluate problem solving strategies, to challenge received opinion and develop own judgements. Clear evidence of capability to operate autonomously and self-evaluate in situations of varying complexity and predictability, but within defined guidelines will be demonstrated. Outputs will be communicated effectively, accurately and reliably.

A clear Distinction

A-

Work of very good quality which displays most but not all of the criteria for the grade above.

A Distinction

B+

Work of highly commendable quality which clearly fulfils the criteria for the grade below, but shows a greater degree of capability in relevant intellectual/subject/key skills.

A very strong Merit

B

Work of commendable quality based on a strong detailed knowledge base for the field of study, including an assured grasp of concepts, principles and major theories, together with effective deployment of skills relevant to the discipline and assessment task.  There will be evidence of considered analysis, synthesis, evaluation and application, and the ability to work effectively with minimum direction to meet defined objectives and develop own judgements.  There will be consistent evidence of capability in all relevant subject based and key skills, including the ability to self-evaluate and work autonomously with minimal direction to use effectively a range of techniques in situations of varying complexity and predictability.

A strong Merit

B-

Work of good quality which contains most, but not all of the characteristics of the grade above.

A clear Merit

C+

Work which clearly fulfils all the criteria of the grade below, but shows a greater degree of capability in relevant intellectual/subject/key skills.

A Merit

C

Work of sound quality based on a firm factual/ conceptual knowledge base for the field of study, including a good grasp of relevant theories, together with the ability to organise and communicate effectively.  The work may be rather standard and limited in its theoretical grasp, but will be mostly accurate and provide some evidence of the ability to analyse, synthesise, evaluate and apply standard methods/techniques, with minimal guidance. There will be no serious omissions or inaccuracies.  There will be good evidence of ability to take responsibility for own learning, some capability to challenge received opinion and form own judgements.  Evidence of the ability to operate with increased autonomy in situations of varying complexity and predictability, selecting and applying appropriate techniques will be demonstrated within limits. There will be competence in relevant key skills.

A very strong Pass

C-

Work of capable quality which contains some of the characteristics of grade above.

A strong Pass

D+

Work of satisfactory quality demonstrating a reliable knowledge base and evidence of developed key skills and/or subject based skills, but still containing limited evidence of analysis, synthesis, evaluation or application, or of appropriate detail or skill application.

A Pass

D

Work of broadly satisfactory quality covering adequately the factual and/or conceptual knowledge base of the field of study and some key theories, appropriately presented and organised, but is primarily descriptive or derivative, with only occasional evidence of analysis, synthesis, evaluation or application.  There may be some misunderstanding of key concepts/principles/theories and limitations in the ability to select relevant material or techniques and/or in communication or other relevant skills, so that the work may include some errors, omissions or irrelevancies.  There will be evidence of ability to operate with some autonomy in predictable contexts, but less evidence of ability to operate in more complex or unpredictable situations.  However, there will be evidence of ability to use a variety of standard techniques, and to meet threshold standards in relevant key skills.

A bare Pass

D-

Work of bare pass standard demonstrating some familiarity with and grasp of a factual/conceptual and theoretical knowledge base for the field of study, together with evidence of some ability to employ specialist skills to solve problems within area of study, but only just meeting threshold standards in e.g. evaluation and interpretation of data and information, reasoning and soundness of judgment, communication, application, or quality of outputs. Work may be characterised by some significant errors, omissions, limitations or problems, but there will be sufficient evidence of development and competence to operate in varied contexts taking responsibility for the nature and quality of outputs.

A marginal Fail

F+

Work which indicates some evidence of engagement with area of study in relation to acquisition of knowledge and understanding of concepts, principles and theories, and of specialist skills, but which is essentially misinterpreted, misapplied and/or contains some significant omission or misunderstanding, or otherwise just fails to meet threshold standards in e.g. communication, application or quality of outputs.

A Fail

F

Work that falls well short of the threshold standards in relation to one or more area of knowledge, intellectual, subject based or key skills. It may address the assessment task to some extent, or include evidence of successful engagement with some of the subject matter, but such satisfactory characteristics will be clearly outweighed by major deficiencies across remaining areas.

A comprehensive

Fail

F-

Work of poor quality which is based on only minimal understanding, application or effort. It will offer only very limited evidence of familiarity with knowledge or skills appropriate to the field of study or task and/or demonstrate inadequate capability in key skills essential to the task concerned.

Non-submission/Nil attempt

G

Nothing presented.

 

 

Guidelines for the ‘Harvard’ system of referencing

The ‘Harvard’ system uses brackets in the text and is one of the easiest referencing systems to use. It is also widely employed in academic publications, both journals and books. The list of references at the end of the essay should be arranged alphabetically with full bibliographic information. The alphabetical list should include all the references which have been used (books, articles, reports, government publications, theses,etc.). The references in the alphabetical list should contain the name of the author, the date of publication, the title of publication, the place of publication and the publisher, set out as follows:

for books:

  • Miles, S. (2001) Social Theory in the Real World, London: Sage
  • O’Byrne, D.J. & Hensby, A. (2011) Theorizing Global Studies, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan

for articles:

  • Jameson, F. (2000) Globalization’ in New Left Review 4 (July/August), pp. 49-68

for chapters in edited volumes:

  • Thompson, K. (1992) ‘Social Pluralism and Post-Modernity’ in Hall, S. and McGrew, T. Modernity and Its Futures, Cambridge: Polity Press, pp 221-255

for government reports or other publications where there is no author’s name:

  • World Bank (2012) World Development Report, New York: Oxford University Press

References in the text of your assignment should always refer to the sources listed in your bibliography. Following the Harvard system, this is done by placing the author’s surname and date of publication in brackets at the relevant point in the text: for example, (Miles, 2001). When quoting directly from a source you should also include the relevant page number(s): for example, (Jameson, 2000: 272).

Footnotes may be used in conjunction with the Harvard system when you have a piece of information to give but it is inconvenient to break up the text to give it. Traditionally footnotes appear at the bottom of the relevant page in a smaller font: most word-processing packages will create them for you. Alternatively, you may put all ‘notes’ at the end and signal them in the text by a superscript or number in brackets.

For more detailed information on the Harvard System of Referencing – including the citation of internet sources – or for a Quick Guide.

 

Office of the Academic Registrar: Statement on Plagiarism

The University unequivocally condemns plagiarism, which it considers to be comparable to falsifying data and cheating in an examination, and warns students that the Senate looks gravely upon incidences of plagiarism and is empowered to recommend severe penalties where students are found guilty of plagiarism. (See Academic Misconduct) 

Definition 

The University considers plagiarism involves an intention to deceive and entails the submission for assessment of work which purports to be that of the student but is in fact wholly or substantially the work of another. Since it is difficult to establish such an intention to deceive except through practice the University defines plagiarism in the following way.

The University defines plagiarism as the incorporation by a student in work for assessment of material which is not their own in the sense that all or substantial part of the work has been copied without any attempt at attribution or has been incorporated as if it were the student's own when in fact it is wholly or substantially the work of another person.

For further details on the policy and procedures regarding suspected academic misconduct, see the

University's STUDENT CODE and information on Academic Misconduct.

 

UMF Assessment regulations and resubmission dates

Please note the following important information regarding the submission of assessments: 

Submission

The essay assignment should be submitted on NILE via the Submit Your Work button. Please follow the instructions that appear after you click on Submit Your Work.

Referral and Deferral

Referred assessments are those where a student is permitted to retake assessment for the module as a second attempt following initial failure (F+, F, F- or G). In these circumstances, the maximum grade is D-.

Deferred assessments are those where a student is permitted to take assessment for the module at a later opportunity, as a result of a decision by the mitigating circumstances panel. In these cases, there is no constraint on the grade.

Extensions

Extensions are given at the discretion of tutors and evidence is likely to be required for requests.

Extensions must be requested at least two days before the assessment deadline and can only be given for a maximum of two weeks.

Late submission

Assessments submitted after the deadline, where an extension has been agreed, are subject to the following penalties:

  • Submitted within one week of the deadline – maximum grade of D-
  • Submitted later than one week of the deadline – referred (i.e. ‘failed’).

Referred assessments

Any item of assessment which has been referred either as graded below a D- on the first attempt, submitted more than one week after the deadline, or not submitted at all may be ‘replaced’ by an alternative assessment with new fixed deadlines (see below), but with a maximum grade of D-.

Deferred assessments

Any item of assessment which has been deferred may be ‘replaced’ by an alternative assessment with new deadlines (see below), with no constraint on the grade.

No extensions are available for referred or deferred assessments. Please note that these are the only opportunities to improve on a failed grade.